Report Animation Workshop joined by Ryo Hirano and the Children

20170429_100_blur_2 Photo by Takaaki Asai
2017年4月に東京都小平市にある「二葉むさしが丘学園」にて、映像作家ひらのりょうさんをゲストに迎えて、子ども向けのアニメーション制作ワークショップを開催しました。二葉むさしが丘学園は、全国に約600施設ある児童養護施設の一つ。親の病気や不在ほかさまざまな理由で家庭で暮らすことが困難な、主に2歳から18歳の子どもたちが生活し、近隣の学校に通っています。施設では、家庭復帰への支援や、子どもたちが社会へ巣立っていくための取り組み、地域との繋がりの場作りなどをしています。今回のワークショップも、施設が取り組む、外部団体との連携プロジェクトで実現した一つです。

Animation gives you freedom. Imagine a free, animated world!

DM_Hirano_20170429_074

Photo by Takaaki Asai

At the beginning of the workshop, after the children and adults introduced themselves, Hirano demonstrated the mechanisms that make the pictures move using a projector, and explained body movements and animation techniques in a way that was easy for the participants to understand. He also shared his animated works and the projects he has been involved in, relaying to the children the sense of joy felt when completing a work as well as the challenges of struggling alone and the difficulties of finding creativity.

DM_Hirano_20170429_094

Photo by Takaaki Asai

After the children had experimented with body movements and gained some understanding of the mechanisms used in animation, the workshop began! Using paints and colored pencils, the children drew freely on paper and expressed the characters and scenes they had imagined. The supporting staff were beside them, helping the children express their ideas through pictures and movements. A boy who had a strong interest in the unknown world of dinosaurs and the deep ocean started to draw a submarine and gigantic deep-water fish as he imagined the world tens of thousands of meters beneath the water. The supporting staff asked him which color he would choose for the dinosaurs and if he would like to make them colorful. The boy replied to the staff with a comment full of affection for dinosaurs: “You must not belittle dinosaurs. We have to treat them with respect.”

DM_Hirano_20170429_156

Photo by Takaaki Asai

In this workshop, it was important that each child, regardless of their drawing skills, had the freedom to paint whatever they liked and do whatever they wanted. Worksheets were prepared to help the children imagine characters, and time was given to enable them to enjoy being creative, so that a child who liked coloring or a child who liked drawing trees and backgrounds could each enjoy doing so.

DM_Hirano_20170429_218

Photo by Takaaki Asai

One child drew slowly after thinking through their ideas while another child worked quickly, each creating at their own pace. One girl drew a cat, her favorite animal, paying great attention to the details in the patterns and colors. One boy who seemed shy and found it hard to make a start worked together with a staff member—a university art student—next to him, eventually turning each of his ideas into drawings.

DM_Hirano_20170429_235

Photo by Takaaki Asai

A boy who depicted a red Mount Fuji and an apple enjoyed drawing while confidently using colors, differentiating between red and pink gradations. He became friends with the staff member next to him, and worked intensively while filled with anticipation to show his completed animation. musashi_web1 Leaving the pictures to dry, Hirano scanned the drawings into the computer in the order that they were completed. One by one, the characters drawn by the children appeared on screen and started to move. This made everyone cheer!

DM_Hirano_20170429_201

Photo by Takaaki Asai

One child appeared very shy at first when their drawings were scanned and animated, but when the drawings were projected they looked content. For this workshop, AIT staff, students of contemporary art school MAD, and students of Musashino Art University located in close proximity to Futaba, participated as facilitators.

DM_Hirano_20170429_248_hoshi

Photo by Takaaki Asai

Presentation of the Animated Works

The completed work of the participants was screened a month later at the event, Haru no Futaba Fes (Futaba Spring Festival) held in Futaba Musashigaoka Gakuen, which was open to the surrounding community. The children watched the completed work together with members of the community and child-support organizations, as well as with the event participants. There were children that watched in the front row, while there were others who, mesmerized by a magic show taking place in the festival, did not even realize that the screening was going on. The event was attended by Ryo Hirano who enjoyed being reunited with the children. Participants who missed the screening also watched the animation over and over again on Hirano’s computer. Being raised by parents who worked at schools for disabled children, Hirano had a strong interest in providing a learning experience for the children. Hirano commented that it had been a truly rich experience to work with the wonderful personalities and creativity of the children who participated.musashi_poster

Comments from Masahiro Takemura

Masahiro Takemura, a coordinator at Futaba Musashigaoka Gakuen who helps the children gain social independence, introduced the environment that the children experience there at an event held at AIT after the workshop. Musashigaoka Gakuen is proactively working to organize irregular dance and music classes, as well as arrange visits to local farms and study tours to disaster-hit areas. “I hope these experiences of making connections with the surrounding community and other participants will facilitate the day-to-day growth of the children. Even if there is no immediate effect or the children cannot express easily in words, I hope they felt something from this experience.” Text: Rika Fujii

Animation gives you freedom. Imagine a free, animated world!

DM_Hirano_20170429_074

Photo by Takaaki Asai

At the beginning of the workshop, after the children and adults introduced themselves, Hirano demonstrated the mechanisms that make the pictures move using a projector, and explained body movements and animation techniques in a way that was easy for the participants to understand. He also shared his animated works and the projects he has been involved in, relaying to the children the sense of joy felt when completing a work as well as the challenges of struggling alone and the difficulties of finding creativity.

DM_Hirano_20170429_094

Photo by Takaaki Asai

After the children had experimented with body movements and gained some understanding of the mechanisms used in animation, the workshop began! Using paints and colored pencils, the children drew freely on paper and expressed the characters and scenes they had imagined. The supporting staff were beside them, helping the children express their ideas through pictures and movements. A boy who had a strong interest in the unknown world of dinosaurs and the deep ocean started to draw a submarine and gigantic deep-water fish as he imagined the world tens of thousands of meters beneath the water. The supporting staff asked him which color he would choose for the dinosaurs and if he would like to make them colorful. The boy replied to the staff with a comment full of affection for dinosaurs: “You must not belittle dinosaurs. We have to treat them with respect.”

DM_Hirano_20170429_156

Photo by Takaaki Asai

In this workshop, it was important that each child, regardless of their drawing skills, had the freedom to paint whatever they liked and do whatever they wanted. Worksheets were prepared to help the children imagine characters, and time was given to enable them to enjoy being creative, so that a child who liked coloring or a child who liked drawing trees and backgrounds could each enjoy doing so.

DM_Hirano_20170429_218

Photo by Takaaki Asai

One child drew slowly after thinking through their ideas while another child worked quickly, each creating at their own pace. One girl drew a cat, her favorite animal, paying great attention to the details in the patterns and colors. One boy who seemed shy and found it hard to make a start worked together with a staff member—a university art student—next to him, eventually turning each of his ideas into drawings.

DM_Hirano_20170429_235

Photo by Takaaki Asai

A boy who depicted a red Mount Fuji and an apple enjoyed drawing while confidently using colors, differentiating between red and pink gradations. He became friends with the staff member next to him, and worked intensively while filled with anticipation to show his completed animation. musashi_web1 Leaving the pictures to dry, Hirano scanned the drawings into the computer in the order that they were completed. One by one, the characters drawn by the children appeared on screen and started to move. This made everyone cheer!

DM_Hirano_20170429_201

Photo by Takaaki Asai

One child appeared very shy at first when their drawings were scanned and animated, but when the drawings were projected they looked content. For this workshop, AIT staff, students of contemporary art school MAD, and students of Musashino Art University located in close proximity to Futaba, participated as facilitators.

DM_Hirano_20170429_248_hoshi

Photo by Takaaki Asai

Presentation of the Animated Works

The completed work of the participants was screened a month later at the event, Haru no Futaba Fes (Futaba Spring Festival) held in Futaba Musashigaoka Gakuen, which was open to the surrounding community. The children watched the completed work together with members of the community and child-support organizations, as well as with the event participants. There were children that watched in the front row, while there were others who, mesmerized by a magic show taking place in the festival, did not even realize that the screening was going on. The event was attended by Ryo Hirano who enjoyed being reunited with the children. Participants who missed the screening also watched the animation over and over again on Hirano’s computer. Being raised by parents who worked at schools for disabled children, Hirano had a strong interest in providing a learning experience for the children. Hirano commented that it had been a truly rich experience to work with the wonderful personalities and creativity of the children who participated.musashi_poster

Comments from Masahiro Takemura

Masahiro Takemura, a coordinator at Futaba Musashigaoka Gakuen who helps the children gain social independence, introduced the environment that the children experience there at an event held at AIT after the workshop. Musashigaoka Gakuen is proactively working to organize irregular dance and music classes, as well as arrange visits to local farms and study tours to disaster-hit areas. “I hope these experiences of making connections with the surrounding community and other participants will facilitate the day-to-day growth of the children. Even if there is no immediate effect or the children cannot express easily in words, I hope they felt something from this experience.” Text: Rika Fujii

参加したスタッフの声(抜粋)

ワークショップ後、一緒に参加した友人と、美術と子どもについての話をしました。二人とも、他の人とはちょっと違った子どもの頃の経験があり、人に話してもなかなかわかってもらえない、という思いがありました。その中で、美術が唯一の表現となり、今でも美術は人との関わりのきっかけであったり、心の支えになっています。今回のワークショップをしたあと「あの子たちにもっと広い世界を見せてあげたい、何でもあり得る環境に1日でも連れて行きたい」と強く話し合いました。「世界には数え切れないほどの選択肢と愛があることを、美術を通して伝えたい。」そんな話もしていました。

AITインターン/武蔵野美術大学生

今回参加してくれた子どもたちは、公の場でものを作るというよりは、自分の表現に素直に絵を描いているんだなと感じました。子どもたちには、絵を描くことや美術は公の営みでありながら、完全に自己の言語を語れる場です。そのグレーな境界の中で、摂取したり吐き出したりしてバランスをとってほしいなと思いました。今回のような、施設で絵を描くというワークショップを組むことは絶対的に価値があると思います。そして、描いた絵がアニメーションとして動くだけでなく、一つの同じ空間で同居するというひらのりょうさんのわくわくする下地づくりに感動しました。

ファシリテーター/武蔵野美術大学生

最初は「絵を描くのは嫌い」と言いながらなかなか筆を取らなかったり、紙を前にしてもなかなか作業に入れず、恥ずかしそうにしていましたが、美術大学生の力を借りて、彼が描いてくれたサメの絵を見ながら自分で描いて見たり、「どんな色に塗る?」「サメをどうしたい?」と質問を投げかけることで、徐々にそれに応答しながら描き始めました。スクリーンに映し出されることをとても恥ずかしそうにしていましたが、自分が描いた絵が映ると、とても嬉しそうな表情を浮かべていました。最初から積極的に制作に向かうタイプではありませんが、周りの大人に励まされながら、慎重に、きちんと考えながら作業を進めていく様子が見えました。過日の発表会の時は一番前に座って、にこにこしながら出来上がったアニメーションを鑑賞していました。

ファシリテーター/AIT スタッフ

同じ絵を何枚も描いて動かすのは、大人でもなかなか難しい作業ですが、子どもたちは皆、それぞれのペースで根気よく制作に取り組んでいました。また、動く絵がどのように出来上がるかという過程をはじめに図で解説したのもわかりやすかったよう。ひらのりょうさんの性格も親しみやすさがあり、すぐに子どもたちとも和んでいる様子でした。

ファシリテーター/AIT スタッフ

絵を書くのは好き(得意)なようですが、じっくりと考えながら描いているのが印象的でした。最初は、なかなか思うように手が進んでいない様子で、色々と書いては消したり、頭の中にあるイメージから静かに制作を進めていました。ライトボックスの席では、ひらのりょうさんに相談したり、スタッフと一緒に、最後の方で一気に仕上げ、数人が並んだかけっこシーンを描いてくれました。複数のキャラクターたちが横並びで走る、なかなか難しい構図を、上手に考えて動きをつけていて、そのユニークな発想が素敵でした。

ファシリテーター/AIT スタッフ
プロフィール
  • ひらのりょう
    1988年、埼玉県春日部市生まれ。多摩美術大学情報デザイン学科卒業。FOGHORN所属。産み出す作品は、ポップでディープでビザール。文化人類学やフォークロアからサブカルチャーまで、みずからの貪欲な触覚の導くままにモチーフを定め、作品化を続ける。WEB漫画トーチにて「ファンタスティックワールド」連載中。 
    twitter @hira_ryo / http://www.foghorn.jp/
  • dear Me(ディア ミー)プロジェクトについて
    NPO法人アーツイニシアティヴトウキョウ [ AIT/ エイト] と日本財団による、子どもとアーティストが出会い、共に表現をする機会の創出や、アート/表現を通じた自由な学びと未知のものに出合う場づくりを通して社会を捉え直すプロジェクト。子どもの福祉施設のほか、さまざまな環境下にある子どもや若者、大人に向けた、対話型の鑑賞プログラムや国内外のアーティストによるワークショップを実施するほか、共に学ぶレクチャーやシンポジウム、イベントを企画。現代アートの多様な表現や対話をつうじて様々な価値観に触れ、世界のひろがりや他者とのつながりを発見するきっかけを創ります。